SEARCH THE ENTIRE CATALOGUE BY ARTIST NAME, TITLE, GENRE & KEYWORD

Dunsyre: Wild Hawthorn Press, 1971
12 x 16.6cm, 2pp. Black on cream with a drawing of various sweets much as one would find on a key sheet in a chocolate box. Some of the sweets however has been given a nautical feel (the rum truffle having a barrel on it being a reminder of how seamen would be given daily grog) or renamed after a boat eg Apricot Jam Boat. Below the drawing is a quotation: "To the initiated they bring almost instant meaning. it is doubtful whether flags will ever become obsolete no matter what advances science may offer." - anyone who has ever had a favourite chocolate (mine is cheery brandy) will know instantly which in a box to snaffle.
The car gives acknowledgment to Simon Cutts who had done similar "Flag" images in the 60s (and which were published in books that also anthologised Finlay). One of 500 printed. VG+.

...

Dunsyre: Wild Hawthorn Press, 1971 22.8 × 82.5cm, folder with the blue on green image by Richard Demarco on the front with a gatefold opening which in turn reveals the exact same image on the inner print but in a different colour blue on blue.
A view of boats roped up in a harbour displays three or four different types of fishing boat (two look very similar but a non-expert cannot be sure). The registration numbers and letters on one boat can be seen.
The title "glossary" more usually means "an alphabetical list of words relating to a specific subject, text, or dialect, with explanations; a brief dictionary" - one might see this selection of boats - each numbered as required by maritime law - as a visual glossary of sea-going vessels. One of 300 such prints made. VG.

...

Dunsyre: Wild Hawthorn Press, 1971
14.6 x 9.5cm, 2pp. Blue and red on white - the front of the card has the text "William & Rose, with a pair of reefs down" above the blue rectangle bordered in red. Donald McGill was a baudy illustrator who made his fame from creating saucy sea-side postcards, the text on the front hints at that slight sexuality with the "pair of reefs down" hinting at the removal of clothing by William and his Rose- whereas in sailing, reefing is the means of reducing the area of a sail, usually by folding or rolling one edge of the canvas in on itself. A humorous allusion. VG+.

...

Dunsyre: Wild Hawthorn Press, 1971
11.7 x 16.5cm, 2pp. B/w photo-image by Gloria Wilson of graffiti on a wooden wall where the majority of words are names of boats written by a crew member. - hence an 'anthology' of those who had visited the space. The location of the photograph is not known by us. VG+.

...