June 1971

Little Sparta: Wild Hawthorn Press, 1971
33 x 31.5cm, red and green on white silkscreen in folder. A boat on the water is reflected from below the hull to become a visual pun of a model airplane. In the title, Finlay references the redwing - a winter bird in the UK and is the smallest true thrush which has red flashes on its wings.
This was the first ever Finlay work purchased by Paul Robertson for this collection.
The image we have used here is from a publication - the print we hold is framed in wood and glass and hard to image without reflections - but the work is in VG+ condition. The signed folder is also retained in the frame. Only 300 copies were made.

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Dunsyre: Wild Hawthorn Press, 1971
25.5 x 20.5cm, 6pp white folder with colophon. Laid in is an original lithograph of 'A Full-Rigged Ship in the manner of Fuseli. The Archangel of Archangel' which is drawn as a concrete and visual poem. The ascending lines for the word Archangel are curved upwards (the florid styling being reminiscent of some of Henry Fuseli's work although not all). The owrd becomes the ship itself.
This copy is signed and numbered by Finlay on the cover as part of the limited edition of 300 copies. Murray 5.28

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London: National Poetry Centre, 1971
25.5 x 20.5cm, 6pp (recto only). The programme for this evening debate on "British Modernism, fact or fiction" between Bob Cobbing and Edward Lucie-Smith. The publication consists only of 5 sheets of stapled images of works by Ian Hamilton Finlay, John Furnival, dsh, Bob Cobbing, and one unidentified work and a cover. This is a very scarce item in VG+ condition.

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Dunsyre: Wild Hawthorn Press, 1971
14.8 x 10.4cm, 2pp. Two shades of red on white silkscreen card - the drawing by Ron Costley is of a a flat red rectangle with a square patch with white stitching.
Finlay refers to patching time and time again in his work - La Belle Hollanaise, the harlequin works of PIcasso, the text of Evening will come...

Dunsyre: Wild Hawthorn Press, 1971
10.4 x 14.8cm, 2pp. Red and brown on white silkscreen card - the drawing by Ron Costley is of a tall mast ship with three large sails - two of which have vertical stripes.
The title refers to the Christmas carol with the opening verse "I saw three ships come sailing in/ On Christmas Day, on Christmas Day/I saw three ships come sailing in/On Christmas Day in the morning"
It is not quite clear Finlay's intent here but there are three distinct main masts to the ship. The song is much argued over - given Bethlehem's long distance from the sea then the three ships are presumably metaphors for perhaps the camels of the magi or some other trio, but by the same poeetic process the three ships can be metaphors for the ship's masts here although it is a bit strange having three ships become one. VG+.

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