May 1986

Little Sparta: Wild Hawthorn Press, 1986
20.5 x 17.5cm, printed dark outer folder content of a single 20.5 x 17.5cm offset lithograph. The folder has the word "TWILIGHT" printed at the top and inner sheet has "TWILIGHT" above the word "remembers" (in lower case as here). The blue paper references the deepening gloom of the passage of the day into night. But still twilight remembers day in the sense that some light is still to be found before darkness falls in its entirely. VG+.

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London: Victoria Miro Gallery, 1986
21 x 10.5cm, 42pp announcement card for a solo show. This card has two drawings - one each side - by Gary Hincks that is not reproduced anywhere else as far as we know. The plinth on one side shows a republican rosette with ribbons left with the words "A DAVID. MARAT". The second drawing is of the back of the same plinth but with gallery details over it. David, of course, painted the famous death of Marat painting, here Marat returns the favour with a simple tribute on the stone.
This is strictly an exhibition invite but it also could be regarded as an artist's card which was not released or categorised as such by Finlay. After some consideration we have left it as an announcement. VG+.

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London: Victoria Miro, 1986
23 x 20.5cm, 12pp plus red card covers. Exhibition catalogue for a solo show - text only, with a "preface" by Stephen Bann which is the only commentary for the exhibition,. VG+.

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Little Sparta: Wild Hawthorn Press, 1986
63.2 x 40.5cm, full colour offset lithograph with seven "cut-outs" to form seed packets. Each packet has the name of one of the guillotined members of Robespierre's Committee for Public Safety who were deposed during the Thermadorian Reaction. The month when that happened was designated as "Arrisoir" in the revolutionary calendar - and the symbol of that month, the watering can is on each packet. Of course, seeds may be regarded as parts of plants that have been separated from the main body - a little like a head in a basket. VG+

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Little Sparta: Wild Hawthorn Press, 1986
Six separate prints - each 27 x 34cm in unprinted folders and outer printed folder. One of 250 copies.
Each print in this portfolio reproduces a drawing or watercolour in one colour for Finlay's six proposals for the garden nurseries in Luton. Each proposal is a definition of a word associated with open nature such as "Flock" but with a classical Greek twist. Drawings were by Gary Hinks.
Ref: Murray 6.18.

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Little Sparta: Wild Hawthorn Press, 1986
11 x 7.7cm, 16pp with printed card covers. A text by Stoddart on sculptural works installed in the Garden Temple considers in the main just one - Terror is the Piety of the Revolution - where the author claims it is a work open to interpretation but "it clears a no-man's-land between the two factions of Neo-classicists and Modernists."
Murray places this in his catalogue raisonne as the last work in the "Wild Hawthorn Press" section - by which he really means it is the last of the books/works published by other authors who are not Finlay himself. The gap in time between the 13th publication in that section and this one is 20 years - which makes us question that categorisation although Murray is right (without actually saying so) to note that Finlay did not publish any other authors other than himself and collaborations after 1968 (with the cessation of Poor. Old Tired. Horse.), We have kept to Murray's organisation scheme here but with slight qualms. Scarce book - VG+ although very slight rust to one staple

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Munchen: Kunstverein Munchen, 1986
26.8 x 20cm,48pp plus pictorial card covers. Exhibition catalogue which includes the shadow play works "Les Ombres" and the installations "Les Monuments". Colour and b/w images of all and an interview in German with the artist (Demosthenes Davvestas). VG+.

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Munchen: Kunstverein Munchen, 1986
15 x 10.5cm, 2pp full colour announcement card with an image from the shadow play installation on the front and verso museum details. The title "LECON DES TENEBRES." translates to "LESSON OF DARKNESS' and the work with its strong lighting and deeply black shadows and grotesque images - which are expanded in size because of the projection on to a wall - is a little unsettling.
Like other installations Boltanski allows the guts of the simple projection techniques to be seen - the lights are modern halogens, the cables are left exposed, the hand made puppets and shapes can be seen as well as their projections behind them. The artificiality is on show.
One might muse as to Plato's allegory of the cave as an influence or a metaphor for unknowing - but we will do that elsewhere. VG+.

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