July 1988

Edinburgh: National Galleries of Scotland, n.d. (1988)
10.5 x 15cm, 2pp. Announcement card with a work by Finlay from the group of works known as the "Picabia Series" - here 'DON'T CAST YOUR REVOLUTIONS BEFORE SWINE". The exhibition was of the work of the surrealist and dadaist Picabia but the museum decided to use Finlay's work as publicity for the show (and the work was exhibited along side the various woRKS from the turn of the century and 1920s.). One of three different cards issued at the same time. Murray has this as an artist's postcard in his catalogue raisonne - but it clearly is not. VG+.

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Edinburgh: National Galleries of Scotland, n.d. (1988)
10.5 x 15cm, 2pp. Announcement card with a work by Finlay from the group of works known as the "Picabia Series" - here 'DON'T PUT ALL YOUR HEADS IN ONE BASKET". The exhibition was of the work of the surrealist and dadaist Picabia but the museum decided to use Finlay's work as publicity for the show (and the work was exhibited along side the various works from the turn of the century and 1920s.). One of three different cards issued at the same time. Murray has this as an artist's postcard in his catalogue raisonne - but it clearly is not. VG+.

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Edinburgh: National Galleries of Scotland, n.d. (1988)
10.5 x 15cm, 2pp. Announcement card with a work by Finlay from the group of works known as the "Picabia Series" - here 'SPARE THE BLADE AND SPOIL THE FACTIONS". The exhibition was of the work of the surrealist and dadaist Picabia but the museum decided to use Finlay's work as publicity for the show (and the work was exhibited along side the various woRKS from the turn of the century and 1920s.). One of three different cards issued at the same time. Murray has this as an artist's postcard in his catalogue raisonne - but it clearly is not. VG+.

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Little Sparta: Wild Hawthorn Press, 1988
15.5 x 10.6cm, 24pp with 4pp light green end papers, card covers and printed dust jacket. The full title of the book is "A Country Lane with Stiles" and explains Finlay's putative "country lane" which was expected to be a major installation in the 1988 Glasgow Garden Festival. However Finlay withdrew his involvement in the Festival in protest at the Strathclyde Region's dispute with him over the Garden Temple.
The lane was to be a metaphoric peon to De Stijl the modernist Dutch art movement and Finlay lists the flowers and trees that were to be planted. The rest of the book are poetic considerations of stiles illustrated by Laurie Clark.

STILES 1
Thesis: fence.
Anti-thesis: gate.
Synthesis: stile

One of 500 printed. VG+. Not in Murray's catalogue raisonne.

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Glasgow: Glasgow Garden Festival, 1988
24 x 30.4cm, 120pp, plus original pictorial card covers. Exhibition catalogue for the popular Garden Festival where Finlay exhibited his Country Lane with Stiles with its dialectic:

THESIS
fence
ANTITHESIS
Gate
and the synthesis being Style.
Another work was a stone plaque on a dry stane dyke wall. Both works are reproduced in b/w in the catalogue. VG+.

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Little Sparta: Wild Hawthorn Press, 1988, 32.6 x 26cm, black on cream lithograph in folder. A drawing by Gary Hinck of the forest next to a pond after the original by WIlliam Kent and a sketch of one of the tree-plaques. Each tree scupture has either SIlence, Schweigen or Silenzio on it "calling attention to the peaceful surroundings". Sadly this print had a faint diagonal crease on the left else VG in like unprinted folder.

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NYC: n.p., 1988
5 x 5cm, b/w transparency with a detail of the Boltanski installation "Monument Canada" from 1988. Handwritten legend on the plastic - a slide provided by a gallery to press or clients. VG+.

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Little Sparta: Wild Hawthorn Press, 1988
8.5 x 12.7cm, 4pp. Artist's card with a reproduced photograph of a Nazi rally where the red swastica flags are brightly coloured against the drab of the uniforms below which the text 'When Pleasures are Like Poppies Spread' (from Rabbie Burns) is continued "or banners in the beds of Roehm's Brown shirts".
Poppies, of course, have became a symbol of war remembrance and the comparison to the banners of evil amongst the crowd seems initially inappropriate but, more deeply, the visual metaphor is perhaps closer to a symbol of forthcoming death. VG+.

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