Augusto de Campos Tag

Brighton: Brighton Festival, 1967
13 x 19cm, printed manilla envelope content of six artist designed cards. Finlay has Star Steer and there are other works by Augusto de Campos, Eugene Gomringer, Jose Lino Gruynewald, Dom Sylvester Housedard, Gerhard Ruehm. There is also an English translation of "From Line to Constellation" by Eugen Gomringer - a manifesto of sorts from 1954.

It is worth noting that Finlay is here amongst those regarded as the giants of the visual poetry movement - a movement that became most prominent in South America but by 1963 Finlay was also producing such works and here is recognised his prominence in the British scene.
All VG in envelope that has a few marks on the back and is stamped "School of graphics Chelsea School of Art".
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Wisconsin: The Beloit Poetry Journal, 1966
21 x 14cm, 40pp plus pictorial wrappers. Single number of this long running Chapbook which here dedicates itself to the concrete poets. Works by all the leading figures including Gomringer, de Campos, dsh, Gerhard Ruhm, Poierre Garnier, Edwin Morgan and Robert Lax amongst others are joined by Finlay - who has three page works including a schematic redrawing of his 4 Sails standing poems which as best we know is not reproduced elsewhere. The cover is also a glass work by Finlay - Rock Wave. VG+.

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Stoneypath; Wild Hawthorne Press, 1966
26 x 21cm, 12pp. The twenty-first number of Finlay’s poetry publication - wholly consisting of concrete poems by Edgard Braga and Augusto de Campos; and designed by Nigel Sutton (typography and layout). Unusually printed red on white. VG+ condition. Scarce.
INSERTED:
21 x 10cm, 4pp. Subscription form for the MIGRANT PRESS with bibliographical history.
This was the first number of POTH published at Stonypath (Later Little Sparta) as Finlay moved there with his partner Sue during 1966. After earlier locations in Edinburgh and Fife this was Finlay's final home for the next 50 years until his death in 2006.

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Edinburgh: Wild Hawthorn, 1964
20.1 x 24.5cm, 4pp. Single sheet with de Campos' text in Brazilian and English. A folded broadside featuring a concrete poem of words arranged on a single line without spacing that begin on the front page but ends on the last with the words "CIDADE. CITY. CITY". The fith publication by Finlay's Press and part of the poet's introduction of the South American concrete poets to the English speaking world. VG+

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Edinburgh; Wild Hawthorne Press, 1963
30 x 21cm, 4pp. The ninth number of Finlay’s poetry publication with contributions by Paul Fort (translated by Nicole Rabetaud), Lorine Niedecker, Ronald Johnson, Rocco Scotellaro (translated by Cid Corman), Libby Houston; John Gray, and Paulo Marcos de Andrade (translated by Augusto de Campos). The inner double spread is based on Ronal Johnson's Sports and Divertissments - which Finlay later published as a stand alone book. The "decorations" herein (reproduced woodcuts) were by Peter Stitt. None of the poems in this issue might be clearly regarded as "concrete".
INSERTED
The "spring list" of books and other items available from the Wild Hawthorn Press. 19 x 29cm, 1pp. Folded.

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Edinburgh; Wild Hawthorne Press, 1963
30 x 21cm, 4pp. The sixth number of Finlay’s monthly poetry publication with contributions by Bernard Kops, Larry Eigner, J.F. Hendry, Attila Jozsef (translated by J.F. Hendry and Edwin Morgan), Louis Zukofsky, Mary Ellen Solt, Günter Grass (translated by Jerome Rothenberg), Michael Shayer, Spike Hawkins, Marcelo Moura, Pedro Xista, and Augusto de Campos. This example is overall VG if slightly browned. Copies were sold for 9d each and were sometimes taken around University unions and departments or sold at poetry / literature evenings as well as by subscription.
Importantly this was the first number of POTH that contains a work that is clearly identifiable as a concrete or visual poem - the back cover has three works by Marcelo Moura, Pedro Xista, Augusto de Campos which Finlay notes are "Concrete Poems from Brazil". It appears it was the South American poets who first gained Finlay's attention and led him to primarily work in the milieu.
Some copies of POTH Nr 6 have a printed slip inserted announcing that "From now on, P.O.T.H. will contain graphic art as well as poetry" - although this copy does not have that slip - but that is a further indication that this was a pivotal number of the journal.

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