Exhibition & Other Posters

Nailsworth: Cairn Gallery, 1998
38 x 29cm, 1pp black on gloss paper. Large b/w inkjet (as issued) exhibition poster for a show of images from Little Sparta taken by Janet Boulton and David Paterson. One image of a broken column in situ in Finlay's garden reproduced on the front. Slightly ripped along edges. Not many produced.

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Edinburgh: Talbot Rice Gallery, n.d. (1991)
69 x 41cm, full colour offset lithographic exhibition poster with a recreation of the painting "The Poor Fisherman" by Puvis De Chavannes - however the mast of the boat has had a revolutionary cockade been added to it. - hence adding a political edge to the image more than the original solely religious intent. The exhibition at the Talbot Rice Gallery that examined the work in some detail and responses to the work.

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Glasgow: Third Eye Centre 1990 83 x 59cm, orange and black offset lithographic exhibition poster for a number of public artworks by artists in Glasgow - including Judith Barry, Stuart Brisley, Peter Fischli and David Weiss, Rosemary Trockel and Ian Hamilton Finlay amongst others. Finlay's work is still visible today - the Bridge Pillars at the River Clyde at the Broomielaw. VG.

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Hamberg: Hamburger Kunsthalle, 1989
84 x 60cm, duotone offset lithograph exhibition poster with a full sheet image of Finlay's Aphrodite of the Terror sculpture and floating text. An exhibition looking at Finlay's work relating to the French revolution. Folded as issued else VG....

London: Arts Council of Great Britain/Serpentine Gallery, 1978
58 x 41cm, three colour offset lithographic exhibition poster with a reproduction of a work "Of famous arcady ye are" - a tank hiding in greenery: a favourite Finlay trope, here with a quotation from John Milton. This was an exhibition that was later exhibited in Wales and used the same poster design. Formerly folded else VG.

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Cardiff: Arts Council of Great Britain, 1978
58 x 41cm, three colour offset lithographic exhibition poster with a reproduction of a work "Of famous arcady ye are" - a tank hiding in greenery: a favourite Finlay trope, here with a quotation from John Milton. This was an exhibition that had previously been in London the year before. Formerly folded else VG.

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Cambridge: Kettle's Yard, 1975
60 x 42cm, olive green and black on white offset lithograph. The line drawing by Ron Costley is a copy of the outline of the original Bernini sculpture of the gods.
There is a text beneath the image: ‘APOLLO AND DAPHNE/ after Bernini/BIBLIOGRAPHY - Ovid, “Metamorphoses”; Rudolf Wittkower, “The Sculptures of Gian Lorenzo Bernini”; Historical Research Unit, Vol. 6, “Uniforms of the SS”’.
The classical story of the pair is one of desire - Apollo being consumed by lust for Daphne (thanks to Eros messing with his motivation) and Daphne desiring to remain chaste (Again this is down to Eros). When Apollo did manage to catch Daphne (presumably with rape his intent) Daphne's father Peneus turned her into an laurel tree - hence saving her virginity.
The Tate Gallery website claims Finlay explained that "the gods and nature ‘were behaving not unlike the Waffen SS’ (who were the first to use a smock with a leaf camouflage pattern, hence its identification with them).
This poster, in which Daphne is wearing a camouflage smock which replaces ‘nature’, was the poster for the title exhibition at the Cambridge Poetry Festival in 1977. It is the same image as in the print APOLLO AND DAPHNE. AFTER BERNINI. 1975 but with exhibition details added at the bottom. Slight crease top right else VG.

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