John Furnival Tag

Glasgow: WAX366, 2020
15 x 10.5cm,2pp. Editioned postcard displaying a photograph of John Furnival in his garden in 1982. Behind the artist is a six part sculpture based on 6 flower pots - each with a different element - EARTH, AIR, WATER, FIRE, TEA AND COFFEE - a rather humorous work which was made in conjunction with an unidentified artist (quote possibly Ian Hamilton Finlay). VG+.

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London: London Magazine, January 1969
21.5 x 15.5cm, 116pp. Original boards. A single number of this long running literary journal which is notable for the first ever publication of the work AFTER THE RUSSIAN by John Furnival and Ian Hamilton Finlay, The work was later reprinted as a stand along broadside by Wild Hawthorn Press. VG condition.

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Two different announcement cards for exhibitions by John Furnival on the back of which is a lengthy hand written note in black ink noting that a librarian at the former Bath Academy had contacted Furnival about Robertson's interest in the early portfolios Furnival printed at the college.
He noted that he had completed one with Finlay: "Headlines/Eavelines" and others with dsh and "Eddie" Morgan as well as one by himself. The note explains how only 20 of each portfolio were made and that a further portfolio with Ernst Jandl was planned but aborted after only 3 prints were made. The missive continues noting how Finlay had allowed Furnival to continue distributing "After The Russia" despite a full stop being missing in the text.
Furnival then noted his boat-prints for the Wild Hawthorn Press and how Finlay "cast me back to Athens from Little Sparta (after refusing to beat up Stuart Mongomery!)."
Furnival then invited Robertson to call him and supplied a number .
Robertson relates the tale told to him by Furnival in the subsequent call about how Finlay had hosted Montgomery for a few days at Little Sparta (then Stoneypath) but had fallen out with him during the drive to the train station where Finlay left him off so that he could go to Furnival next. Furnival received a call from Finlay while Montgomery was in transit "asking me to punch Stuart in the face as soon as he got off the train which of course I refused to do". Thereafter Finlay refused to talk to Furnival for not administering what he saw as justice for a slight and their collaborations ended.
JOPINT: Original mailing envelope franked 22 September 2003.

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London: National Poetry Centre, 1971
25.5 x 20.5cm, 6pp (recto only). The programme for this evening debate on "British Modernism, fact or fiction" between Bob Cobbing and Edward Lucie-Smith. The publication consists only of 5 sheets of stapled images of works by Ian Hamilton Finlay, John Furnival, dsh, Bob Cobbing, and one unidentified work and a cover. This is a very scarce item in VG+ condition.

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Dunsyre: Wild Hawthorn Press, 1970
11.7 x 16.4cm, 4pp. Christmas card with the image of a fishing boat by John Furnival along with the Port Letters (FR), the Fishing Nos (531), the net tonnage (53), horse power (42) and its name (Xmas Rose). A visual poem by Finlay - a companion work to the one published year earlier (Xmas Star). Both Xmas cards were also published as much larger prints by the Press. In this drawing the boat is facing left, the first card has the boat facing righ - perhaps the first going to fish, the second returning to port.
Finlay's interest in boat names and numbers is reflected in the beauty of Furnival's line drawing. The boat is a poem on water. VG+.

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Dunsyre: Wild Hawthorn Press, 1969
11.7 x 16.4cm, 4pp. Christmas card with the image of a fishing boat by John Furnival along with the Port Letters (FR), the Fishing Nos ((87), the Radio Call Sign (MWCZ), the gross tonnage (53) and its name (Xmas Star). A visual poem by Finlay which one year later was joined by related work Poem/Print No. Xmas Rose released as the Xmas card for that year. Both Xmas cards were also published as much larger prints by the Press.
Finlay's interest in boat names and numbers is reflected in the beauty of Furnival's line drawing. The boat is a poem on water.
This example has a pencil greeting inside on the blank pages "Best Xmas Wishes from John Furnival". VG+.

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Dunsyre: Wild Hawthorn Press 1970
51 x 71cm. Printed b/w offset. Furnival's outline drawing of a Scottish fishing boat is placed above Finlay's poem appropriated from the boat number, port, size and painted name - here Xmas Rose. A companion print to Poem/Print No. 11 (Xmas Star). Very good condition. One of 350 copies. Druckgrafik nr 4.70.4.

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Dunsyre: Wild Hawthorn Press 1969
51 x 71cm. Printed b/w offset. Furnival's outline drawing of a Scottish fishing boat is placed above Finlay's poem appropriated from the boat number, port, size and painted name - here the boat is called Xmas Star. A companion print to Poem/Print no 14 (Xmas Rose). When shown together the two prints have boats going in a different directions. Very good condition. One of 350 copies. Druckgrafik nr 4.69.2.

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Woodchester: Openings Press, n.d. 1969
48 x 48cm, blue and brown on thin card - a proof copy of a concrete poetry work which offers a made up headline which is more or less a joke. The text being set on a round baseline reflects the fictitious race being "round the bay".
Possibly unique in form on this paper, this was an early text proof of a page created with John Furnival as part of his later published Portfolio (see listing elsewhere). VG+.

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Stoneypath; Wild Hawthorne Press, 1967
30 x 21cm, 12pp. The twenty-fourth number of Finlay’s poetry publication. Designed by Alistair Cant with photographs by Graham Keen. This is a photographic record of visual poetry works exhibited at different sites during the Brighton Festival and a de facto catalogue for the event. Works by Claus Bremer, Eugen Gomringer, Ian Hamilton Finlay, Hansjörg Mayer, John Furnival, Edwin Morgan, Stephen Bann and Kenelm Cox. VG+.

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Bath: Opening Press, 1967
47. 5 x 47.5 x 1.5cm, silkscreened portfolio case content of 13 individual silkscreens in various colours on thin card. The silkscreens are all concrete poems which were based on correspondence between Ian Hamilton Finlay and Eve Furnival - John Furnival's young daughter. Finlay had sent simple concrete poems to the young girl - and when he was invited to work with Furnival in the latter's class at Bath Academy these poems were created with the students (one student per print) and this portfolio produced.
There is great humour in this work - like elsewhere in Finlay's oeuvre - ambiguous headlines from real and made up newspapers give the basis for many of the works. Lobster boats here look nippy, Waterlilies lead double lives and are warned that they must reflect. hedgehogs announce annual turnovers as if they were banks or just rolled in defence.
This is one of the most rare Finlay publications. One 50 numbered copies were made. This example is internally in VG+ condition although the cover has a horrible paper scuff (although the cover is based on a childish drawing by Eve Furnival.

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Stoneypath; Wild Hawthorne Press, 1967
26 x 21cm, 12pp. The twenty-third number of Finlay’s poetry publication - here designed by John Furnival and contributions by Max Weber, Theodore Enslin, Pierre Albert-Birot (translated by Stephen Bann),Ian Hamilton Finlay, Eli Siegel, Gael Turnbull, George Mackay Brown, Edwin Morgan, and Ronald Johnson. This number reverting to the more common collection of poems by different artists. VG+ condition. Scarce.

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